What Do Personal Trainers Think About Beachbody? My Honest Opinion

As a qualified personal trainer, I’m often asked the question, “what do personal trainers think about Beachbody?”

Below, I’m going to give my honest opinion on what I think about Beachbody and whether I believe it’s a good option if you’re trying to lose weight, get fit or stay healthy.

woman exercising at home

What Do Personal Trainers Think About Beachbody?

In a nutshell – I love Beachbody. I think it’s an innovative company that offers something for everyone. In fact, this is one of the things I love the most about Beachbody and leads me to my first point.

BEACHBODY OFFERS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

Completely new to exercise? Then try “A Little Obsessed,” a 5-day program designed to help beginners prepare for the popular 80 Day Obsession program.

Pregnant? The Active Maternity Series is a great option.

Want to get into beast mode? Give Insanity Max:30 a go.

Prefer yoga or pilates? You’ll love Piyo.

As you can see, the options are virtually endless. In fact, there are over 40 different programs on Beachbody on Demand so it’s difficult NOT to find something you enjoy.

BEACHBODY ALLOWS YOU TO AVOID “GYM CULTURE”

Something I cannot stand is the typical “gym culture” – and yes, that’s coming from a qualified personal trainer.

What do I mean by “gym culture?”

I’m talking about the massive, jacked-up men who make you feel intimidated and in their way when you’re trying to use a piece of equipment.

The guys who ask to cut in between your sets, sweat all over your equipment and don’t even reset the weight back to what you had it at.

The people who look at you out the corner of their (judgy) eye and make you feel like crap because you’re not wearing the latest Gymshark leggings.

You know what I mean…

Avoiding this gym culture is one of the reasons I love home workouts, and Beachbody is basically the mack daddy of at-home workouts.

BEACHBODY IS BUDGET-FRIENDLY

In my opinion, one of the best ideas Beachbody ever had was to release Beachbody on Demand, which allows you to log in and stream your favorite Beachbody programs over the internet.

The first Beachbody product I ever bought was Insanity. This was back in 2011, after my husband and I watched a late-night infomercial. We immediately bought the DVD and couldn’t wait for our box to arrive.

I can’t remember exactly how much we paid, but I do know it was over $100.

I still own that DVD but let’s be honest – if you can stream 40 Beachbody workouts for $99/year, why would you pay over $100 for just one program?

Full disclosure – sometimes I do use my Insanity DVD just for “old times sake” – what can I say, I’m nostalgic.

But I digress – $99/year for full access to 40 Beachbody workout programs is incredible value, and much less than a gym membership which cost an average of $50/month (2).

Want to try Beachbody on Demand for free? Click here to get a free 14-day trial.

However, nothing is perfect – not even Beachbody. Below, I’ve listed some of the potential cons of Beachbody.

Beachbody Cons

UNQUALIFIED COACHES

My biggest gripe with Beachbody isn’t with the programs themselves – it’s with the fact that virtually anyone can sign up and become a Beachbody “coach.”

To be clear, I’m not talking about the Beachbody trainers – people like Shaun T, Tony Horton, Chalene Johnson, etc. Beachbody trainers are highly qualified and experienced, and create incredible fitness programs. I’m talking about the people who sign up to sell the Beachbody programs.

The term “coach” implies someone who has training and qualifications that allow them to safely and effectively lead people through their fitness journey, but that’s not actually the case with Beachbody coaches.

Instead, all it takes to become a coach is filling out an application form and paying a small fee. And there’s nothing wrong with this – it’s providing a way for people to make some money sharing the products they love.

The problem is when “coaches” give out fitness and exercise advice that they’re not qualified to provide – this has the potential to cause injury.

An example of this may be a poorly trained coach suggesting a pregnant women start a program like Insanity, that features plyometrics.

Plyometrics should be avoided during pregnancy for a number of reasons, including an increase in the hormone relaxin, which helps to prepare the body for labor and delivery but also reduces the stability of the joints (3).

If you have any medical conditions, I recommend consulting with a health professional before starting Beachbody (or any new workout program.)

Having said that, if you’re looking for a coach to motivate and inspire you, then there are plenty of wonderful Beachbody coaches who do exactly that.

PUSHING OF SHAKEOLOGY

Shakeology is Beachbody’s flagship nutritional product.

If you’ve spent any time researching Beachbody then there’s little doubt you’ve heard of Shakeology – it’s pushed hard by both the company and Beachbody coaches.

Shakeology is a meal replacement shake that many people use to assist with weight loss. Shakeology is healthier than many other competing products (1), however it’s quite expensive and I’m personally not a fan of substituting real food with shakes, especially not long-term.

With that said, I’m not against the Shakeology product in and of itself – rather, I wish it wasn’t pushed so heavily by Beachbody (but I understand the reasoning – it is their flagship product, after all.)

So What Do Personal Trainers Think About Beachbody? (Or THIS Personal Trainer, At Least)

In summary, I think the Beachbody products are excellent. They’re high-quality and the Beachbody trainers are engaging and knowledgeable. Beachbody on Demand is very reasonably priced at $99/year and the fact that you can exercise from home makes it much easier to fit in your daily workout.

However, I would caution you against feeling pressured to buy Shakeology, especially if it’s out of your budget. In addition, if you need exercise or fitness advice, make sure your Beachbody coach is qualified to provide this kind of advice, otherwise consult with a qualified professional.

References:

 1. Jillian Kubala, MS, RD (2018, July 10). Shakeology Diet Review: Does It Work For Weight Loss? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/shakeology-review

2. Carlo Dellaverson (2010, Aug 3). The True Cost of Gym Memberships. Retrieved from https://www.cnbc.com/id/26663228

3. Kara Mayer Robinson (nd). Plyometrics. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/a-z/what-is-plyometrics

What Do Personal Trainers Think About Beachbody
What Do Personal Trainers Think About Beachbody?